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4 Hexagon layers of Neodymium magnets reaching Terminal Velocity with the help of some compressed air. Hanging from a string of Neodymium magnets. The magnets reach such a high speed the magnetic force can no longer repel the centrifugal forces supplied by the compressed air.

We have tried several different formations and it would seem mass does have an effect on how high of an RPM you can reach before they give out.


So i was not sure what exactly is going on here from a force stand point so i asked someone smarter this is what he told me... "This is a classic angular rotation/centrifugal force (or is it centripetal?) Problem. As the angular speed increases, the force required to keep it together increases (obviously). The fun comes in the hexagonal structure of the overall mass and the "subcells" ill call them. The radial force is transferred through the lattice using these angular "bonds" "The fun part is determining if it flies apart at the edge, or further in because the inner bonds have to resist the outward acceleration of all subcells further out. I bet the first delamination occurs at the point where the air contacts the mass. That exact point has to deal with the force of the air and the magnets. "

Destin from Smarter every day https://www.youtube.com/user/destinws2

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  • Terminal Velocity

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current05:41, June 10, 2014Thumbnail for version as of 05:41, June 10, 201401:23480 × 269 (14 KB)Poloniumll (wall | contribs)created video

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